Archive for the ‘graphic design’ Category

Rajai Davis

Tuesday, August 17th, 2010
Illustration of Rajai Davis

Rajai Davis

I haven’t posted much to this website in a long while. I’ve been working a lot lately and raising my wonderful, baby boy, Mateo. Tonight, Mateo went to bed early, which left me enough time to put this illustration together.

Rajai Davis is my favorite active baseball player–Frank Thomas is my favorite. I’ve wanted to do a baseball themed illustration for a while, so I thought I would draw Rajai. Of course, as is almost always the case, it’s nothing like I expected it to be. I wanted it to be much more stylized and much more cartoony. Still, I’m pretty happy with how it came out.

Good luck to Rajai and the rest of the Oakland Athletics.

Nafiz’s Heirloom Tomatoes

Tuesday, January 19th, 2010

Last year, I was asked to design a logo and image for a T-shirt. This is the finished image that adorned the back of the T-shirt:

Nafiz's Tomatoes, T-shirt Design

Nafiz's Tomatoes, T-shirt Design

I know the family that this design was done for and a lot of what you see in the illustration is a not-so-funny inside joke. Still, when I look at it, it makes me smile because it makes me think of Nafiz and tomatoes and having a passion for something that you do–like the passion that Nafiz has for his heirloom tomatoes.

It also reminds me that tomato season is coming soon.

Resolution

Friday, May 18th, 2007

Chances are, if the image that you’re looking at on you computer monitor looks fine, it won’t look very good when it’s printed.

Images that are design for the screen are very different from images that are design for print. For one thing, screen images typically have a resolution of 72dpi (dots per inch) while print images typically require more than 4 times that (at least 300dpi). That means that for every inch that your image spans the printed page, an image designed for print will contain more than 4 times the data , which translates to more than 4 times the detail.

Here are some examples for you: (These are all designed to show the relative difference between these three resolutions when printed).

600dpi (nearly all printers can handle this, some printers go up to 1200dpi):

600dpi (High Resolution)

600dpi (High Resolution)

300dpi (This is what I would consider to be the lowest resolution that one might want to use when printing grayscale or color):

300dpi (Print Resolution)

300dpi (Print Resolution)

72dpi (This is an example of how images that you might pull off of the web, or from a screenshot will print)

72dpi (Low/Screen Resolution)

72dpi (Low/Screen Resolution)

As you can see the detail progressively lessens as does the print quality.

The moral of this story is: When you pay a designer to do work for you, pay extra for the full resolution artwork. That way, when you have go to someone else, years later, to produce a print ad for you, you don’t have to tell them, “pull the images off of my website,” and they won’t have to try to explain to you why that won’t work.

Everything Orange

Thursday, May 17th, 2007

The following is exerted from the MB Web Design Blog:

#2 – “Just one more small change…”

Though it seems trivial to “change everything from red to orange,” you might have to change a PSD or PNG file, export all the slices, modify the stylesheet, modify some other details to complement the new colour… the list goes on. Only for the client to say “nah, I don’t like the orange. Make it red again.”

Everything Orange

Everything Orange

In his blog entry, Nightmare Web Design Clients, the author, Mathew Browne, describes many of the most common mistakes made by web design clients and how these mistakes impact their designer.

I have only been working in freelance design for about a year-and-a-half, but I’ve been working in the design industry for nearly thirteen years. While some of the specifics do change the ultimate facts are the same:

  1. One can never charge enough for the amount of work that ultimately goes into any creative endeavor and truly feel financially rewarded.
  2. In the end, your client is your customer and customers are always right–even when they’re wrong.