Rajai Davis

by Brian Belew on August 17th, 2010
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Illustration of Rajai Davis

Rajai Davis

I haven’t posted much to this website in a long while. I’ve been working a lot lately and raising my wonderful, baby boy, Mateo. Tonight, Mateo went to bed early, which left me enough time to put this illustration together.

Rajai Davis is my favorite active baseball player–Frank Thomas is my favorite. I’ve wanted to do a baseball themed illustration for a while, so I thought I would draw Rajai. Of course, as is almost always the case, it’s nothing like I expected it to be. I wanted it to be much more stylized and much more cartoony. Still, I’m pretty happy with how it came out.

Good luck to Rajai and the rest of the Oakland Athletics.

Mateo

by Brian Belew on March 19th, 2010
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Ma.teo sleeping

Mateo

Winter in California

by Brian Belew on March 8th, 2010
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Nafiz’s Heirloom Tomatoes

by Brian Belew on January 19th, 2010
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Last year, I was asked to design a logo and image for a T-shirt. This is the finished image that adorned the back of the T-shirt:

Nafiz's Tomatoes, T-shirt Design

Nafiz's Tomatoes, T-shirt Design

I know the family that this design was done for and a lot of what you see in the illustration is a not-so-funny inside joke. Still, when I look at it, it makes me smile because it makes me think of Nafiz and tomatoes and having a passion for something that you do–like the passion that Nafiz has for his heirloom tomatoes.

It also reminds me that tomato season is coming soon.

Fall in California

by Brian Belew on October 29th, 2009
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I enjoy the subtleties of the seasons in Northern California. This is dusk in the Fall:

Halloween Crafts

by Brian Belew on October 28th, 2009
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Every year, around Halloween, I get asked by friends and family to build props for their Halloween costumes out of corrugated.

I’ve make coffins, chainsaws, skateboards and weapons of all varieties. This year, I made a guitar.

It still needs embelishments, but it’s a good start.

Mister George & Oscar

by Brian Belew on October 28th, 2009

This is Mister George and Oscar:

Mister George & Oscar

Mister George & Oscar

It’s a detail from an illustration that I am currently working on. When finished, the illustration will decorate one full wall of my new child’s room.

The Scale of the Human Condition

by Brian Belew on October 11th, 2009
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I’m currently reading Lathe of Heaven (1971), by Ursula K. Le Guin. I have not read many books by Le Guin–just The Left Hand of Darkness–but I am very fond of her writing.

Lathe of Heaven is a story about a man named George Orr. When George Orr sleeps and dreams his dreams effect the world around him–things change. Things small and large, from paintings to the population of the planet, change.

At the start of the story, Orr is forced into therapy with a psychiatrist, named William Haber. Haber discovers Orr’s ability and attempts to use it to improve the world. Meanwhile, when Orr suspects that Haber may be manipulating his dreams, he seeks help from no-nonsense attorney, Heather LeLache.

Lathe of Heaven Cover (1st Edition)

Lathe of Heaven Cover (1st Edition)

This story is huge, but Le Guin’s telling of it is small. The world–even the universe–changes around these three people in the space of a single page turn. Rapid, enormous, important changes that we, as the audience, experience through the eyes and actions of Orr, Haber and LeLache. Le Guin’s narrative restraint reduces the cosmos to the scale of the individual.

Le Guin manages to address big social concerns, such as over-population, climate change, nuclear proliferation and racial tensions through the–ever-changing–lives and experiences of just three people. And the effect is to place these big, and radical for their time, concerns into a relatable context that tends away from preachy didacticism.

The effect of Le Guin’s choice to restrain the scope of her narrative is to create a story that is compelling on a very human level, while informing the audience on an Earth-sized scale.

Crow “Illustration”

by Brian Belew on October 6th, 2009
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I put this simple illustration together today. I was inspired by the Halloween season.

Crow

Crow

It’s essentially a traced still from a video that I shot outside of my home. The trees here are filled with crows and the cacophony of their calls at dusk is a little bit spooky, a little bit pleasant, and often amusing.

Portfolio Problems

by Brian Belew on September 28th, 2009
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For some odd reason, I can’t get one of the images in my portfolio to display properly. All of the images display at full size, except for the page from “The Mystery of the Manse” that I inked. That one page is displaying at about 200%. I may have to rebuild the whole gallery, which is a pain, but I do want my work to present well.

Comic Book, Page, Inks: "Mystery of the Manse"

Comic Book, Page, Inks: "Mystery of the Manse"

I should just delete the image, seeing as how I only inked it, but I’m really happy with how it turned out. Mike Moss, the artist who drew the page did such a great job–to date, I still believe that this is some of his best work–but, maybe the sizing issue is a sign.

Update: The media uploader changed my file names. I used double-dashed in my file names and the software changed them to a single dash. For the Haunted Mansion page, I manually updated the file by copying it into the directory on my server and I didn’t rename it to match the given names of the other files.